Community Events
03/19/2013 - 12/18/2019
Wednesday Night Bingo (Ferndale VFC)

11/10/2014 - 11/26/2018
Monday Night Bingo (Lake Shore VFC)

11/12/2014 - 11/28/2018
Wednesday Night Bingo (Orchard Beach VFD)

11/13/2014 - 01/28/2021
Thursday Night Bingo (Glen Burnie VFC)

01/01/2015 - 12/31/2020
Monday Night Bingo



Web Counters
Website Visitors
Since
July 30, 2008
901,793
Visitors Today
Apr 21, 2018
506
April is Alcohol Awareness Month
Email Email Print Print PDF PDF RSS RSS Facebook Google+ Twitter

By Member John Long, Jr.
April 9, 2018

“Changing Attitudes: It’s not a ‘rite of passage.’ ”

Alcohol and drug use by young people is extremely dangerous--both to themselves and to society--and is directly associated with traffic fatalities, violence, suicide, educational failure, alcohol overdose, unsafe sex and other problem behaviors, even for those who may never develop a dependence or addiction. Adolescence is a time of heightened risk-taking and as alcohol and drugs enter the picture, parents are faced with a unique set of challenges. Parents often forgive underage drinking as a “rite of passage.” They can simply sit back and hope their kids will “get through it,” or they can change their attitude and take an active role in learning about alcohol and drugs and help their kids do the same.

It can be daunting to talk with children about drinking and drug use, but it is well worth the effort parents put into it. In fact, research has shown that kids who have conversations with their parents and learn a lot about the dangers of alcohol and drug use are 50 percent less likely to use these substances than those who don’t have such conversations. Here’s the opportunity when parents can reinforce that using alcohol is not a ‘rite of passage.’ In fostering “changing attitudes” parents can help kids understand that drinking isn’t a way to feel or be independent, “cool,” or to fit in socially. Young people can learn that alcohol is not necessary for having a good time and non-use of alcohol is a healthy and viable option. We can learn to respect another person’s decision not to drink alcohol.

“Alcohol and drug use is a very risky business for young people,” says Andrew Pucher, President and CEO of NCADD, “and parents can make a difference. The longer children delay drinking and drug use, the less likely they are to develop any problems associated with it. That’s why it is so important to help your child make smart decisions about alcohol and drugs.”

An integral part of Alcohol Awareness Month is Alcohol-Free Weekend (March 30-April 1, 2018), which is designed to raise public awareness about the use of alcohol and how it may be affecting individuals, families, and the community. During this seventy-two-hour period, NCADD extends an open invitation to all Americans, young and old, to participate in three alcohol-free days and to use this time to contact local NCADD Affiliates and other alcoholism agencies to learn more about alcoholism and its early symptoms.

For a list of other organizations in the field and other resources we have prepared this useful guide

No Caption
 

Comment Comment 0 Comment(s)


Website Designed and Hosted By Content Proudly Maintained By Contact Info
Firehouse Solutions
www.FirehouseSolutions.com

Anne Arundel County Volunteers
Firefighters Association

8501 Veterans Highway
Millersville, MD 21108

Emergency Dial 911
E-mail: info@aacvfa.org
Copyright © 2018 Firehouse Solutions (A Service of Technology Reflections, Inc.)